Workshop topics:

Thinking Like a Horse:

Horse psychology for riders. How do we know what we know about horses? Why do horses do what they do? Fascinating research giving a fresh perspective for better communication between horse and human in the training, warm up or show ring.

Mounted Sessions:

Is it me or my horse? Solving puzzles, based on the science of how horses think and learn. Groups of 1-4 riders.

Riders will work with me on whatever training area they feel needs improvement (or let me spot an area!)

Examples: slowing the canter, achieving consistent gaits, lead changes,teaching lateral movement, lightening the lazy horse or                 behaviour issues. For western riders: perfecting neck reining, trail obstacles or pattern work


Other ideas:

  • • Navigate trail obstacles – for competition and just for fun! A great off-season training project. Gain fine-control of your horse by    maneuvering through obstacles. Or prepare for competition – from trail show classes to Extreme Obstacle competition to Pony Club Trec    events. Step-by step – how to teach it and score it.
  •  
  • • Show and Tell A fun practice show in which the judge explains class strategy and gives feedback on performances and tips for
       improvement.

Unmounted workshop topics:

Thinking Like a Horse:

Horse psychology for riders. How do we know what we know about horses? Why do horses do what they do? Fascinating research giving a fresh perspective for better communication between horse and human in the training, warm up or show ring.

How Horses Learn:

how to teach your horse any skill, systematically, based on the science of equine behaviour.

The Thinking Rider: stepping up to the next level

Reaching your goals is like climbing a staircase…

Long term goals:

Do I want to compete? What are some alternative goals besides showing? Overcoming obstacles (fear, finances, time, talent). The Four T's of choosing the right horse to do the job.

Short term goals:

What's my weekly, daily plan? Save yourself time and trouble in each schooling session using science of equine behaviour. How to teach my horse a new skill step by step.


 


 


 


 


 


 

Through the show program

Class by class through your group’s class list. Score cards, penalties, class procedures. What are judges looking for? Bring your questions! Examples:

  •  
  • •  Western pattern classes (western horsemanship⁄equitation, western riding (flying changes), competitive trail, reining.
  • •  English equitation.
  • •  Rail⁄flat classes (Hunter under saddle, the hack division, western pleasure).
  • •  Working hunter (over fences) and jumper.
  • •  Showmanship, halter and conformation.
  •  
NSEF 2013 Clinic

Making the most of your show day.

How to avoid butterflies, brainfreezes and blowups!


Warm up, mental preparation, safety tips, memorizing a course, ring strategy, troubleshooting, and tips for the "pit crew" (parents, spouses, coaches).


When things go wrong in the show ring: How to prevent and recover from unexpected challenges. ("But he never does that at home!").

Schooling at home: Making your practice time count!

Does your training time need a creative game plan? Trotting around the same worn track? (Need to fit the maximum skills into a minimum time budget?) Lindsay lays out a logical schooling session based on science how horses learn. Repetition, attention span, reward, variety and choosing appropriate tack. Lindsay's favourite patterns for the horse and the rider to ban boredom! Adapting the session to the seasoned, green, or horse with an "issue". Save yourself time, trouble and trauma as you step toward your goal!

Bits, spurs, whips and martingales.

How to use them, or abuse them, and how to choose them.

The art of neck reining.

Power steering for your western horse! Hints on moving from a snaffle bit to a curb.

Show ring preparation.

"What Not to Wear!" Appropriate dress and tack… even on a budget! For western and English riders. Many small factors combine to get that winning look – turnout, confidence, show ring strategy. The difference between poise and pose.


The topics above can work in a lecture environment, demonstration round pen, or a large ring with multiple riders. I am very comfortable with adapting the principles to all disciplines and to
non–competitive riders.

OEF Conference 2007